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Thread: adi-walnut L-00 build thread

  1. #11
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    OK glued the neck and heel blocks in (ooops, I forgot to bevel and shape their backsides up!!!! Hand tool time). I also have the top and back rough-cut. But they are thick so there's gonna be a planing party, maybe tonight!

    by samvanlan, on Flickr

  2. #12

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    looking good! Nice piece of walnut. I'm having a custom Martin spruce/walnut dread built. It'll be my poor man's Jackson Browne!

    Keep the pics coming!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by elasticman
    looking good! Nice piece of walnut. I'm having a custom Martin spruce/walnut dread built. It'll be my poor man's Jackson Browne!

    Keep the pics coming!
    Thanks elasticman! Look fwd to seeing your Martin.

  4. #14
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    Ok, cruising along. The good is that structurally all is still aok and I'm having moments of patience. I've been willing to backtrack to get things better and or closer to right. So I like that. Ultimately I still have a long way to go to get some consistency in aestetics.

    The bad was that both neck blocks were glued in a bit off center. Not a big deal but those are key reference points so I trimmed them up in situ to be more centered.

    The ugly is my kerfing. I trimmed some up but didn't focus too much on dimensions. So there's areas where it's wider and deeper and thicker etc. I also suck a glueing them in. So it doesn't look great.

    Making mahogany kerfing (sawing on my ruler was stupid fyi)
    Adi-walnut L00 by samvanlan, on Flickr

    Glueing in kerfing with hot hide glue. Hair dryer is key tool here to help me keep pace, by extending the working time of the HHG.
    Adi-walnut L00 by samvanlan, on Flickr

    Planing top of side and kerfing to match the radius of the top and back:
    Adi-walnut L00 by samvanlan, on Flickr

    Baking the top (I also did it to the back). Common practice as it turns out. Not the same as torrifying obviously.
    Adi-walnut L00 by samvanlan, on Flickr

  5. Default

    Looking good! How do you keep the angle on the back kerfing consistent with a plane? I did a LOT of pondering on that one, not having, nor wishing to borrow, sufficient funds to buy a radiused sanding disc . It never even occurred to me to try baking the top, or body woods. I have to ponder the implications of that. I see the advantages of it in helping the top "age" more quickly. but it seems to me that baking it in an oven would have to really dry the wood out humidity-wise. I suppose that wouldn't be a real problem, so long as you rehumidified it and it was stable before you used it. Oh, and if the dumbest thing you did in the build process was cut into your ruler, you are a much better man than I. I am nearing the end in my quest, and there is hardly any part that I didn't either have to unglue and reglue correctly, or start over because of breakage, or other stupidity.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark the Magnificent!
    Looking good! How do you keep the angle on the back kerfing consistent with a plane? I did a LOT of pondering on that one, not having, nor wishing to borrow, sufficient funds to buy a radiused sanding disc . It never even occurred to me to try baking the top, or body woods. I have to ponder the implications of that. I see the advantages of it in helping the top "age" more quickly. but it seems to me that baking it in an oven would have to really dry the wood out humidity-wise. I suppose that wouldn't be a real problem, so long as you rehumidified it and it was stable before you used it. Oh, and if the dumbest thing you did in the build process was cut into your ruler, you are a much better man than I. I am nearing the end in my quest, and there is hardly any part that I didn't either have to unglue and reglue correctly, or start over because of breakage, or other stupidity.

    Haha mark! Thanks for checking it out and asking questions. Fyi I reglued two bits of kerfing and some of the side braces. I don't mind reglue ing if I used HHG.

    Radiusing: I'm cheap on this one too but luckily I have Adobe illustrator skills! I made some damn giant circles in that program and printed it out on 8.5x11 (printed 3 pages to capture a longer arc of the radius). Then I cut the curves out and laid them on a board, band sawed it and smoothed it up with sanding. I can send you a Pdf if you want. And then I use 3x5 cards stacked to create the radius dish for glueing in radiused braces.

    Cooking: well, it does draw out all the humidity but then the wood just reabsorbs water once removed from thd oven. The negatives are that if the wood is fresh, they will curl a bit. I read a bunch about it on forums and most people who'd tried it, continue to do it. One or two didn't find it that useful. But we bake our sides don't we? And I think the sides always feel lighter, and really audibly more responsive to just touching the wood after the sides have been bent....so that's gotta be good right?

    Here's a link to a bob Taylor article about it. And I guess he convinced bill collings to do it too....so I've read. They refer to it as pre-stressing the top.

    http://www.premierguitar.com/article...ture_or_Nuture

    My radiusing approach:
    Adi-walnut by samvanlan, on Flickr

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    Wow, you are apparently a whole lot handier/more creative than I am. My approach was more Neanderthal...."Me take stick and make angle on it!!


    [IMG][/IMG]

    I cut the angle and glued the wedge on. The back kerfing I did by gluing sandpaper to the wedge, laying the board across the body and sanding with the wedge end while holding the other end down. The top angle was so close to flat that I just used the other side of the board!

    I kinda figured you would have to get the RH of the wood back up after baking it, if you didn't want to risk it cracking. I'm impressed with your work, and with your ability to build the jigs and side bending tool, etc. Those proved to be at least as big a challenge as the guitar, for me. I apologize if I'm sounding picky, etc. I'm just trying to pick your brain, since I have discovered there are some flaws to my methods. I don't understand why I find the building process so fascinating when I have proved I'm such a klutz at it!!

  8. #18
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    Hey mark. Not even sure how you use your board?!?? Anyways, whatever works and/or whatever we learn from.

    Fyi and I'm sure you know this but there's always someone better (and I ain't saying that's me ) so we might as well accept ourselves and what we accomplish and thrive in our imperfection! Although every luthier will admit to making mistakes, I don't see too many focusing on them. So we don't have to either!

    I come from academia and a family that questions everything so I'm unfazed by (or used to) critical evaluation. And you have not even seemed picky in the slightest. You seem passionate and interested. And that's why I'm building too. Not cuz I'm great at it but because I love everything about acoustic guitars.

  9. #19
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    Top and back have been thickness planed to ~2.5-2.8 mm and 1.8 mm respectively. Back seems a little thin (and I've been there before and it did not go well with 1st guitar). But I'm still gonna go for it! Many luthiers suggest that a good guitar is on verge of collapse.

    Also just finished radiusing and glueing up back braces to 10' radius. The first time I glued in radiused braces I staggered 3x5 cards at the brace radius and then put top on them and go-bar glued them in. This time I just cut out radiused ribs (4) and put fiberboard on top and then used the go bar setup. I like these radiused 2x4 ribs better.

    Untitled by samvanlan, on Flickr
    by samvanlan, on Flickr

    You can see saw marks from resawing. The back was getting too thin so I'm just leaving that area as is. Not perfect but pretty hidden inside guitar.
    by samvanlan, on Flickr

  10. Default

    Looking good! There's nothing like having the right tools for the job. That's part of the problem, for me. I've got a bedroom full of sanders and saws and clamps and such that make it nearly impossible to walk or use it as a bedroom. I need a dedicated space for this, but I have so many more things waiting in line for funds that are more important (like a roof and some car repair, not to mention the ever-growing deductible amounts on health insurance that I found out about after the fact). I know it's not a competition (if it was, I'd be losing!), but, in looking at the work of several other people who have started building, I am kinda discouraged by the crude nature of my work in comparison. I like your go bar arrangement. Once again, I just cut the radius and marked where the brace went, then spread glue on it and put a bunch of clamps on it. I could only do one brace at a time, but it seemed to work OK. It occurred to me today, when I was thinking about trying a #3, if for no other reason than the need to try and learn from my previous mistakes, that I might need to consider building RH guitars, too! Otherwise, I'm going to end up with a whole house full of homemade Lefty guitars that nobody wants!

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