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Thread: Taylor V class bracing


  1. #2

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    I saw that as well.Taylor feels like it is a complete game changer. I'm for anything that makes a guitar sound better. It's funny because what it does is make all the older models of Taylor obsolete. A few years back Taylor came up with their relief route and changed the bracing to alter the voicing of their guitars but that has much the same effect of making the earlier one's less desirable. I'm sure Taylor thinks they are going to corner the market with this new bracing but if it really catches on then good luck selling your old Taylor. Martin has a sound that they faithfully reproduce. Their VTS system improves their sound but that is only for the $$$$ models so your old Martin will hold it's value. Taylor plans on using this new bracing on all their guitars eventually which might translate into lots of new sales but we will see if the used Taylors can hold their value.

    G

  2. #3

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    If this is as revolutionary as they're claiming, I wonder if it might migrate to other manufacturers. I personally like some of the "friction" he refers to, but that's mostly in the hearing of other people's playing; sometimes the dissonance can be intriguing. In my own playing, anything that sounds out of whack does sap my confidence. It's certainly an interesting development.

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    It may be revolutionary for Taylor, not so much in the greater scheme of guitar makers. There've been so many manufacturers past and present who have come up with their own bracing and will continue doing so going forward. And no one yet knows how a "V-braced" Taylor holds up over time, whether structural or other problems might arise.
    2009 Gibson Les Paul Standard Ebony (Left-handed)
    2002 Gibson "Goldtone" GA-15RV
    1990 Ovation Legend L717 (A-bracing)

    Finely transcribed Cat Stevens Guitar Tabs (fan project)

    "Believe me when I say that some of the most amazing music in history
    was made on equipment that's not as good as what you own right now."--Jol Dantzig, founder of Hamer Guitars

  4. #5
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    Mario Proulx, noted Canadian luthier and builder of STRONG guitars, said on Facebook he tried a very similar bracing system years ago. The sound? "Meh", he said.

    Gary

  5. #6

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    Basically everything I have heard amounts to an infomercial for Taylor. The new bracing is only available on four of their most expensive models so it looks like it will take awhile to filter down to the masses.

    G

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    I find it fabulous that Taylor experiment even with their fundamentals although, personally, I find neither the brand nor any of their guitar designs particulary appealing. And I don't think it detrimental that they're making a big commercial fuzz out of it. I mean why wouldn't they, that's what NAMM is for, isn't it?

    With bracings, it's always a fine line to strike between providing the top with enough structural integrity to prevent warping or collapsing while at the same time allowing enough flexibility in order to let the soundboard resonate freely. For those that find the traditional X bracing a little too restrictive in terms of the latter (because it favors stiffness), the V bracing sounds like a formidable alternative. At the very least I wouldn't hesitate to give a V-braced noncutaway Taylor a try.

    Since Ovation was brought up, I feel it necessary to stress that none of their bracing patterns look quite like Taylor's new invention even though they did come up with a lot of designs over the decades. They have various fan bracings (similar to what you see in classical guitars), the VT bracing (mostly applied to Glen Campbell models), and, to my mind, one of the best acoustic steel-string bracings ever invented, the A bracing—a pure tone-bracing with a thicker soundboard for their woodtop acoustics in order to make up for the loss in structural integrity, and cranked up to eleven in their Adamas models where a composite top requires no restriction as natural wood would.

    2009 Gibson Les Paul Standard Ebony (Left-handed)
    2002 Gibson "Goldtone" GA-15RV
    1990 Ovation Legend L717 (A-bracing)

    Finely transcribed Cat Stevens Guitar Tabs (fan project)

    "Believe me when I say that some of the most amazing music in history
    was made on equipment that's not as good as what you own right now."--Jol Dantzig, founder of Hamer Guitars

  7. #8

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    Taylor doesn't do anything half way. If we're reading it, the concept has already been vetted. I like Taylor's "forward thinking" approach to guitar design and construction. While I'm also fascinated with the whole "vintage now" industry (be it looks, tone or both), I applaud Taylor for trying to further the design of the flattop acoustic guitar. They modify their guitars and then offer them to the players and adjust over time based on customer response. Their ES pickup system is an example of that. It seems that it is constantly being tweaked and, based on my trials of various versions, I think it has improved and is much easier to use than the Fishman "barn door" offering that preceded it. That said, I don't think the new design will negate previous guitars. I still have my '95 512c with it's X braced top, pre NT neck joint, florentine cutaway and no onboard pickup EQ system and I don't plan on selling it any time soon. Other acoustics come and go, but that one stays. Still, if I get the opportunity to try a lefty V braced Taylor, I will not pass on it.

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