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Thread: Rebracing top on my Guild JF30

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    I was just re-reading this thread, because I think it is pretty doggone fascinating! I noticed a bit back where you stated you didn't like the white binding, and that the original had yellowed/browned with age. Have you tried the submerging it in coffee trick, or are there issues with that I am unaware of? I keep reading this thread and keep thinking I ought to try again, but then I go and look at/play my first two attempts and decide that might not be a good idea!

  2. #42
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    Hey mark. I don't know what the guitars in for but do you see something in the pic?

    I hadn't heard of the coffee trick so if I face another repair/redo like this where one binding has turned yellow and one is brand new white, I might try it!

    I would say DO NOT HESITATE to build a new one if your passion is flowing. I guarantee you'll get better and make it to a point where you're closer and closer to satisfied.

    If you want either explain here or pm about what's wrong with your builds. You may have told me but I don't remember.

    As a related aside: I just resurrected my number #2 build (that was for me). I used tuners on another build. The birds beak headstock joint had also popped loose (imperfect joinery). And the guitars intonation (especially on the B string) was never that good. I thought it was mostly due to an inaccurate slotting of 3rd fret and sssumed I'd have to make a new neck. But I decided to re-rout saddle slot further back, even though my tuner and theory suggested I had the saddle positioned right. Well after first bump back intInaction was better but still problematic. So I filled and re-routed even further back and PRESTO, intonation is acceptable.
    Last edited by Sam Van; 10-18-2016 at 11:05 AM.

  3. #43
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    Ok, now letting varnish cure. I also have several repairs to do on the top. And I've discovered some excellent ding repair CA glue and accelerator so I expect good results!

    Here's a pic of the back, soon to be buffed!

    Untitled by Sam Van, on Flickr

  4. #44

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    What a gorgeous back. Just stunning. Great work!

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    I agree with Shane. The back is beautiful! What are the two dark wedges on the upper treble bout and lower bass bout?

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark the Magnificent! View Post
    I agree with Shane. The back is beautiful! What are the two dark wedges on the upper treble bout and lower bass bout?
    Thanks Shane and Mark and dammit Mark, hehe.....those dark wedges are macassar ebony to fill two place where the maple broke off when cutting out back along the outline. Because it's my guitar I didn't redo it in a less conspicuous way because I'm truly experimenting with my craft and aesthetic. I don't really love the way it turned out so next time I think I will bind any broken edge land then fill with wood that matches the back and sides, if that makes sense.

    The figure on this back made it pretty wild to work with. After resawing it, it immediately warped something fierce. So then I stickered it for a few days etc. But then when I was cleaning up hide glue, it cupped and warped like crazy again. Sooo, just some moody wood. But I do indeed love the craziness of the figure.

    Sam

  7. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Van View Post
    Thanks Shane and Mark and dammit Mark, hehe.....those dark wedges are macassar ebony to fill two place where the maple broke off when cutting out back along the outline...

    Sam
    After I posted, I suddenly realized that it might be because of breakage, but it looked so geometrical that I thought it was deliberate. On the plus side, with or without those two little wedges, that is some of the nicest figured maple I think I've seen. Iff the sound matches the woods looks, it'll be stellar! Can we expect to hear a sound sample when you get it back together? I'm betting it will be head and shoulders above what it was before you started tinkering with the way Guild built it!

  8. #48
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    Yo mark! Yeah they're geometrical because I cut the breaks so that I could fit the wedges easier.

    I think there's a good chance it will sound much better and then a small possibility it will still be too boomy. Before finish and glueIng on bridge, it was possibly gonna be a touch boomy based on tap tones etc. But now with finish and bridge, the top-back tap tones have tightened up and seem pretty good, but it's close! Just gotta string it up. Maybe this weekend. And then if it's not right, I'll replace again. That would be sad but I could probably buy the rest of the backs i resawed for preston. Because if I indeed did something wrong then on this one, it was making back too thin, 0.07". This particular maple was not that stiff. And jumbos don't need to be too lightly built, so I've learned.

  9. #49
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    Woohoo! Also fixed dings and other screw ups from popping bridge on and off etc.

    The guitar is still adjusting under string tension (it's almost like a new guitar!).

    But it's sounding pretty darn good I think. It takes me awhile to determine if I really think it's got it. But it's not too woofy, very responsive, loud and both strums and finger picks well! My son commented "where'd you get that guitar? It sounds good". That's potentially an objective view. But I am entirely happy because it's not too woofy anymore. And I'm learning how to repair guitars!

    Jf30 by Sam Van, on Flickr

    Jf30 by Sam Van, on Flickr

    Jf30 by Sam Van, on Flickr

    Jf30 by Sam Van, on Flickr

  10. #50
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    Jf30 by Sam Van, on Flickr

    Jf30 by Sam Van, on Flickr

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