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Thread: Rebracing top on my Guild JF30

  1. #11
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    Glad you guys are watching and I'm also going to go on the oak topic for a sec, BUT.......

    I just realized the tone bars on this "lefty" are righty oriented!!!!!! The sacrilege!!!! I am one who believes that it doesn't make a huge difference but even more reason to do this thing the right LEFT way.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by elasticman View Post
    I love reading (and looking) at threads like this. Thanks!

    I've owned a JF30 and wondered why it was so heavy. Now I know. It did sound amazing though.

    slightly off topic:
    I wonder what an all-oak guitar would sound like? Oak is really hard like mahogany, so it might work. And it's easy to find super-wide boards, especially in New England. I imagine it would be hard to cross-cut or whatever it's called.
    Good stuff, elastic! I kind of missed the point of "different" guitars when I decided there was a problem with the jf30 after seeing, hearing and feeling the scgc guitars. The jf30 wasn't supposed to be like them. So yeah, it did sound good in its own way, as is. But seriously, though I feel bad for effing up a worthy guitar, it has been worth the destruction just because it got me to a smarter place for doing my own builds. It also showed me that, for example on my ladder braced gene autry, that I could take just a bit of wood off to get it more responsive. Cuz that guitar sounds great from just a tiny bit of shaving.

    As for oak: I don't know if you were meaning a top of white oak too, but I don't think it would work that well. It's a strong and hard wood, but it does not have much longitudinal stiffness. But as back and sides wood, it seems to be well respected in smaller circles. John Arnold loves it. Brentrup builds with it a lot. It reportedly has a very vintage tone but I shall soon see for myself. Here's a pic of the build. It's perfectly quartersawn and seriously figured. And I have quite a bit more. And the board I got was pretty inexpensive. Fun stuff. The back has pernambuco and ebony back stripe.

    Untitled by Sam Van, on Flickr

  3. #13
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    Sam,

    Great thread!! Thanks for the photos.

    As far as oak, do you remember the "pallet guitar" built by Bob Taylor from a used oak shipping pallet as a way to prove that it is more the builder than the wood? Oak back, sides and neck.

    bill

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by LeftyB View Post
    Sam,

    Great thread!! Thanks for the photos.

    As far as oak, do you remember the "pallet guitar" built by Bob Taylor from a used oak shipping pallet as a way to prove that it is more the builder than the wood? Oak back, sides and neck.

    bill
    On the original, the top was oak too.

    http://www.guitaradventures.com/tayl...t-guitar-story

  5. #15

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    Very cool project, Sam! Thank you for sharing!

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    Very cool project, Sam! Thank you for sharing!


    Thanks George!

    Ok so I ended up going cheap route and traded resawing a pkt billet in exchange for a back! Here it is glued up last night with a backstrip.

    Now, the question is how shalt I brace it? I'm planning right now to go with a traditional 1940s J-200 pattern. Has anyone played different jumbos and if so were there certain guitars that stood out from the rest? Would love to hear your thoughts.

    Although the j-200s tapered braces might seem similar to the guild, the Gibson knifes are significantly narrower than what was originally on this guild. So, I think the combo of 2 tone bars instead of 3 and 4 finger braces instead of 6 plus a smaller bridge plate as well as knife braces should get this guitar sounding great again.

    Untitled by Sam Van, on Flickr

  7. #17
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    Ok I found and drafted a design that I think is very faithful to a vintage sj-200.

    In the late 30s the sj-200 replaced the advanced jumbo. Only 300 of the AJs were built between 1934-1938 ish. Apparently they didn't sell well. So rumor has it that some of the design elements of the AJ went into the sj-200. As luck would have it I had to make plans for an AJ anyways and found a perfect plan of a 1936 aj drawn up by willi henkes. I compared that to John Thomas x-rays of AJs and all looked great.

    There are several plans out there for jumbos but I found one of a 1941 sj-200 that looked promising. John Thomas also did x-rays of an sj-200 so I got to compare to make sure the plan was good, which it was. Then I overlayed the AJ with the sj-200 and indeed the back braces are in identical positions as is the x-brace relative to sound hole and tone bars. The finger braces are spread a bit farther apart to accommodate the fatter jumbo and the x is spread a bit wider.

    So below is the new back and back braces. Also here's the plan I used but I did indeed flip the tone bars to lefty!!!


    Jf30 by Sam Van, on Flickr


    Jf30 by Sam Van, on Flickr

  8. #18
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    Ok top is braced like it was supposed to be! I like it and am really excited to Get the job done.

    Jf30 by Sam Van, on Flickr

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    Sam,

    Looks amazing! I have a question, if you don't mind. In your 9/16/2016 post you show your top diagram with the braces, pick guard position, etc. There are areas that appear to be deliberate where there are cutouts, specifically the center of the X and the ends of the braces. I suspect the ends of the braces might be to show where the scalloping starts, but I wonder, and if the open space of the X might be the portion that the cloth reinforcement strip covers. Could you enlighten me, please? I want to learn

  10. #20
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    Thx mark! Ok you're too analytical for your own good (as I am ). I just cut those little pieces out to translate the bracing layout to the actual top and/or back. Easy peasy!

    I choose the tapering/scallop points visually by staring at pics of braced tops/back that are tried and true.

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